Cantharellus cinnabarinus

Cantharellus cinnabarinus (Schwein.) Schwein.

 

The red chanterelle, native to eastern North America, has a wide distribution. Found scattered or alone in summer and fall, it is easily recognized by its flamingo pink to cinnabar red pigments and well-spaced decurrent false gills. This species contains multiple carotenoids, but the most prominent is canthaxanthin. This phytochemical is common in nature, used as an additive in the food industry, and is being studied for a variety of medicinal applications. The convex cap is 1-4 cm across with a stipe 1-4 cm long and 0.5-1.5 cm wide. The pinkish-cream spores are smooth, ellipsoid, and measure 6-11 x 4-6 micrometers.

 

    

Figure 1. Mature C. cinnabarinus (left) and the characteristic false, decurrent gills (right). 

It is mycorrhizal with several hardwoods including oak, beech, aspen, and hickories. It smells fragrant or sweet and tastes peppery when cooked.

Figure 2. Conducive environment for C. cinnabarinus growth.

 

Taxonomy

Basidiomycota

Agaricomycotina

Agaricomycetes

Cantharellales

Cantharellaceae

Cantharellus

cinnabarinus

 

Basionym: Agaricus cinnabarinus

 

References

Kuo, M., & Methven, A. S. (2014). Mushrooms of the Midwest. University of Illinois Press.

Kuo, M. (2015, March). Cantharellus cinnabarinus. Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.Com Web site: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/cantharellus_cinnabarinus.html

National Center for Biotechnology Information. PubChem Compound Database; CID=5281227, https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/5281227 (accessed Oct. 3, 2018).

10.03.18

Comments are closed.