Hebeloma crustuliniforme

This fungus is nick-named “poison pie” because despite its enticing appearance, it can cause sever gastrointestinal disturbances.

This fungus can be mycorrhizal on both hardwoods and conifers, and is widely distributed in North America. The mushroom can fruit in late summer or fall. This specimen was found in mulch in the MSU horticulture gardens in early November.

Caps are known to be 2-33 cm and convex, slimy or viscous when fresh. Whitish or pale tan often with darker coloring in the center, and an inrolled margin when young. Stalk is fairly even except the base is often enlarged. At the apex of the stalk, this species has characteristic white flakes. Gills are pale when young and crowded, becoming brownish with age. This specimen when collected was white, but gills turned golden brown after drying.

Spores are elliptical or almond shaped, and smooth or minutely roughened. Spore prints are dull brown, which I obtained (pictured below).

References

Wood, M. (n.d.). Hebeloma crustuliniforme. Retrieved February 12, 2016, from http://www.mykoweb.com/CAF/species/Hebeloma_crustuliniforme.html

Kuo, M. (2012, March). Hebeloma crustuliniforme. Retrieved from the MushroomExpert.Com Web site: http://www.mushroomexpert.com/hebeloma_crustuliniforme.html

Arora, D. (1986). Mushrooms Demystified (2nd ed.). Berkley: Ten Speed Press.

 

Specimen found in MSU horticultural gardens, note small white flakes at apex of stalk

Specimen found in MSU horticultural gardens, note small white flakes at apex of stalk

 

Spore print of specimen obtained on aluminum foil

Spore print of specimen obtained on aluminum foil

Spores from spore print under microscope

Spores from spore print under microscope

12.03.16

Comments are closed.